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Delhi hospitals record surge in viral fever, dengue cases

“Every year we witness an increase in the cases of viral fever and dengue. This year too, we have witnessed a similar surge. In comparison to last week when we had about 2,500 in all the departments combined, this week’s figure has spiked to 3,000.”

IANS | New Delhi |

Delhi hospitals have witnessed a surge in viral fever and dengue cases this week, with over 2,000 cases being registered daily.

Talking to IANS, Lok Nayak Jai Prakash (LNJP) Hospital Medical Director, Dr Suresh Kumar said: “Every year we witness an increase in the cases of viral fever and dengue. This year too, we have witnessed a similar surge. In comparison to last week when we had about 2,500 in all the departments combined, this week’s figure has spiked to 3,000.”

“Presently, LNJP has only 2-3 patients of viral fever,” he said.

On scrub typhus and leptospirosis cases, which grabbed headlines as “mystery disease”, he said: “We have not come across even a single case of scrub typhus and leptospirosis.” He added that these diseases are “pretty common and usually take place during wet season with geographical and environmental reasons and hygiene playing a significant role in the infection”. They are presently restricted to only one region, he said.

As on Tuesday, Uttar Pradesh’s Firozabad district recorded 51 deaths, including 40 children, and hundreds of hospitalisations in the span of a fortnight. As per reports, the viral fever is now spreading to the neighbouring Mathura and Mainpuri districts.

Chacha Nehru Bal Chikitsalaya’s Medical Superintendent, Mamta Jajoo said: “We are getting 1,500 OPDs (Out Patient Department) daily but they are normal viral fever cases. Even the dengue positivity is low at our hospital.”

A vector-borne disease, scrub typhus is a bacterial infection transmitted through mites’ bites. The disease can be prevented by using insect repellents. According to health agencies, people should avoid overly bushy areas, as they might harbour the bacteria-carrying chiggers.

“If not treated, the disease can cause complications like high-grade fever and severe infection, leading to multi-organ failure,” Dr Suresh Kumar said.