THE MUNITIONS BOARD CASE

To The Editor Of The Statesman

SIR, – on the 23rd December last a search warrant dated 21st idem was served upon me and a very large number of my books and documents were removed from my premises. The search warrant purported to be in connection with an alleged inquiry into various charges in connection with the affairs of the late Munitions Board. On 7th January the High Court set aside the order for a search warrant and ordered the books and documents to be returned to me. Apart altogether from the very great inconvenience caused to me, the course taken would clearly suggest that I was unwilling to give inspection of my books and documents or to produce them if required before the courts. This suggestion is quite untrue. I am today writing to the Chief Presidency Magistrate to inform him of this fact in case any further ex parte application should be made with the intention illegally of obtaining possession of my books.

T.R. PRATT.

Calcutta.

HOUSE RENTS IN CALCUTTA

To The Editor Of The Statesman

SIR, – No one can doubt that the way rents are being put up by speculators spells absolute disaster to the man with an income anything below Rs 800 a month, and it is inevitable that Government officers will insist on their home allowances being increased. It is very difficult for legislation to meet the difficulty. Every day property is changing hands at fabulously increased prices. The Government have not even sounded a warning note, and it is difficult to see how these speculators can get their fingers burnt under the circumstances even if adequate legislation be introduced. A threat by Government that it intended to bring in legislation would have been quite sufficient to have kept down prices until the Commission had sent in their report. Five hundred additional flats in Calcutta would bring rents toppling down to their old figure. All the Bengal officials drawing over Rs 700 a month could be housed there and the flats now rented by the officials would be vacant.

TENANT.

Calcutta.

INDIAN POLITICS

To The Editor Of The Statesman

SIR, – On opening The Statesman today I was glad to read your well-considered article on the attitude which should be adopted by the European members towards the Moderate Party. I have never mixed in politics so far, but it appears that absolute neutrality in Indian politics will be an impossible game in the near future. Of criticisms we have had more than enough in the past, when the attitude of an Indian towards all Government measures was one of hostile criticism and that of the non-official European was one of apathy with a thin veil of approval. It augurs well for the future government of the country that the non-official European can get over his apathy and the Indian his spirit of criticism, and that both will combine together in a well reasoned constructive programme for the improvement of the country as a whole on European lines.

P.N. DUTT.

Calcutta.