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Attack’ movie review: John Abraham doesn’t disappoint fans

Attack plays out like a smart video game designed for teenagers of all age groups where the super-soldier hasn’t lost his heart yet in the web of artificial intelligence.

SNS | New Delhi |

Its history that whenever an action movie is backed up with emotions it has made the fans happy. John Abrahams’ Attack’ has followed the same sigma.

Attack plays out like a smart video game designed for teenagers of all age groups where the super-soldier hasn’t lost his heart yet in the web of artificial intelligence.

John Abraham, who is also one of the film’s producers, plays an incapacitated Army Major who is revived by a computer chip and turned into a super-soldier programmed to take on a terror mastermind out to reduce India’s Parliament building to rubble.

The movie could be very much related to the Hollywood thriller Paul Verhoeven’s Robocop. It was about a Detroit police officer who is fatally wounded and turned into a powerful cyborg. The Attack protagonist’s wound does not kill him nor is he transformed into an unfeeling machine designed to counter violence with greater violence.

John Abraham plays the role of Major Arjun Shergil who has been immobilized by severe bullet wounds sustained during a terror attack on an Indian airport. The incident makes him permanently confined to a wheelchair and also robs him of the woman he loves who is played by Jacqueline Fernandez.

Ten years later, he is in the right place at the right time. He saves an air hostess from a great fall. The act culminates in an unintended kiss – as cheesy a first encounter as any.

Love blossoms before tragedy strikes. A miracle in the form of a super-soldier programme run by a bright young scientist (Rakul Preet Singh) under the aegis of pugnacious defence ministry official Subramanian (Prakash Raj) not only liberates the Major from the wheelchair but also gives him a new purpose in life. You have to watch the movie for knowing what is being discussed.

The cinematography which is done by Will Humphris, P.S. Vinod, and Soumik Mukherjee is strikingly fluid all right but the visual effects are of an erratic quality and have room for improvement.

Rajit Kapur got convinced to play a caricature reflection of a Minister we know after his impressive act as Nehru in Rocket Boys. Also, someone killed Jacqueline again in a film. I don’t know if that is exactly bad.

The movie is overall good as it simplifies the science of heroism, certainly has its moments, but it could have done with a few more.

You can watch the movie in your nearest theatres.

Here is the trailer: