OCCASIONAL NOTE

The second meeting of the Council of the League of Nations in London proves that the League is alive, but the report of the proceedings can hardly be said to prove very much more. Without America the Council is incomplete; with America it will possess a working quorum which will enable it to bide its time until the progress of events renders it possible to make the organisation complete by the inclusion of former enemy States and Russia. In America the prospects of the Peace Treaty have taken a turn for the better, partly as the result of Lord Grey’s recent letter; partly as the result of the decision of the Republican leaders to unite with the Democrats in a movement to bring the Treaty back before an open session of the Senate; and partly as the result of the understanding which appears to have been arrived at between President Wilson and the Democratic Senators represented by Mr. Hitchcock. To stand aloof from the Treaty and the League is an impossible attitude for the United States. The case is one which makes an imperative call upon American parties to compromise their differences. This is evidently recognised, and it may be hoped accordingly that future meetings of the League will be strengthened by American representation.

UNIVERSITY EDUCATION IN THE U.P.

ALLAHABAD, FEB 14

Sir Harcourt Butler presided at a meeting of the Committee to reconstitute Allahabad University. His Honour in the course of his speech said I wish to put before you an ultimate ideal, viz., university teaching and residential universities in this Province at Allahabad, Benares, Lucknow, Agra and Aligarh. To ensure this and carry out the recommendations of the Sadler Commission we shall have to face big changes. Existing institutions have done great work but we must be prepared to sacrifice some of their present advantages for the larger educational life that is to come. Certain draft resolutions were then to be discussed. The chief of which were:- (i)intermediate education with broader, (ii) in no case intermediate education to be combined with university education.

RELIABILITY OF SURETIES

LUCKNOW, FEB 14

An interesting point concerning the certification of the reliability of sureties arose before the Judicial Commissioner of Oudh on the application of Babu Ram Autar, manager of the Jaunpur Bank, who stands charged with embezzlement, for the transfer of the criminal case against him from Barabanki court to some other court. As it was a serious matter for a legal practitioner to vouch for people he knew nothing about, he would have to take notice of it. The Government pleader admitted that there was nothing on record to show how the Deputy Commissioner came to the conclusion. The Judicial Commissioner passed an order transferring the case to the court of the City Magistrate, Lucknow, remarking that the circumstances justified a transfer from Barabanki.

GIRLS EDUCATION

This morning a deputation of about fifteen ladies waited upon the President of the Poona Municipality in the Municipal Office to urge the imperative need for introducing compulsory primary education for girls as well as for boys. The deputation consisted of the leading women of the Brahman and the nonBrahmin classes and included a Christian Missionary lady, Miss Gordon, who last evening held a big public meeting demanding the simultaneous application of compulsion to the education of boys and girls. Mrs. Ranade and Mrs. Khedker, who have been addressing at least one ladies’ meeting every day for the last fortnight, led the deputation. Mrs. Ranade first said how much feeling had been aroused among even the orthodox women by the proposal before the municipality to leave out girls from their scheme of compulsory education.

MRS. BESANT ON STRIKES

MADRAS, FEB 14

Mrs. Annie Besant, addressing a meeting of the Madras and Southern Mahratta Railwaymen’s Union quoted Charles Bradlaugh’s opinion:- Do not strike unless you are driven into it by utter misery. I have, said Mrs. Besant, just read a printed message in which it is stated that there are threats of a strike among the railway workers. If you hear anyone advising a str ike ask first whether the man who advises it is going to suffer if a strike takes place. No man has the right to send others into starvation unless he shares starvation with them. The Agent of the Madras and Southern Mahratta Railway in a circular to the employees, says that anonymous letters are being circulated among the employees, at Perambur workshop urging them to strike work.