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Technology–Boon or Bane

The fast-paced stream of information on the Internet is not really in sync with the slower pace of real-life situations, which often results in frustration and bitter disappointment.

SNS | New Delhi |

The other day, two early morning strollers literally bumped into each other in a South Delhi park and suffered minor bruises. The villains of the piece were the mobile sets in their possession, which had kept them deeply engrossed.

This exemplifies the extent to which the handy devices have enslaved our daily lives and the deep chasm that exists between the virtual and real world. Mankind’s over-reliance on technology and mechanised gadgets has virtually sounded the death-knell for human ingenuity, endeavour and finer skills.

The availability of figures and useful information at the mere press of a button or keyboard have undoubtedly facilitated speedier execution of mundane jobs, but have made humanity totally dependent on machines for even normal calculations.

The malaise has permeated the system to such an extent that many people, cutting across different age-groups, cannot readily recall even their mobile or account numbers.

Needless to add, the advent of mechanisation has had a deleterious impact on our analytical and creative abilities, loss of focus in communication and relegated human beings to mere data collectors rather than being providers of useful knowledge and information.

The fast-paced stream of information on the Internet is not really in sync with the slower pace of real-life situations, which often results in frustration and bitter disappointment.

It has been conclusively proven that excessive usage of technology damages the brain, affecting decision-making, resulting in memory loss, attention span and sleeping disorders, whose immediate fallout is heightened anxiety levels and severe depression.

These adverse features, coupled with man’s abject servility to mechanised aids have often proved to be counter-productive. As Christian Lous Lange, the renowned Norwegian political thinker has aptly summed it up :”Technology is a useful servant but a dangerous master”. To ensure sustainable productivity, an optimal mix of technology and human ingenuity is the need of the hour.

Tailpiece

Going by Sarojini Nagar, Lajpat Nagar, Tilak Nagar, Karol Bagh or Sadar Bazar markets, Diwali shoppers of Delhi may take a millennium to accept the government’s advice to switch to online buying for gifts or items of personal use.

(Contributed by: Deepak Razdan and Amit Banerjee)