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Viswakarma Puja and the tradition of kite flying

Rigveda regards him as the father of architecture and mechanics. Every year Viswakarma Puja is performed in factories and workers seek blessings in the hope that manufacturing and machinery would run smoothly for the rest of the year. 

SNS | New Delhi |

According to Hindu mythology, Lord Viswakarma is regarded as the craftsman of Devalok. He is the divine architect and the creator of the universe. Rigveda regards him as the father of architecture and mechanics. Every year Viswakarma Puja is performed in factories and workers seek blessings in the hope that manufacturing and machinery would run smoothly for the rest of the year. 

But unlike any other Puja, Viswakarma Puja offers more reasons to get soak in the celebration. This Puja is associated with an old tradition of kite flying that goes back centuries. The day begins with the shout of ‘bhokatta’ as you wake up to see a sky painted in tiny colourful specs of kites. In an array of colours and forms, various kites are soaring in the sky competing with each other. Petkati, Mayurpankhi, Chandiyal, so many names and a plethora of colours paint the canvas of the sky in bold strokes. 

Children from neighbourhoods participate in local kite fighting tournaments and it becomes a whole day affair of fun, fight, cheers, colours and roars. But what’s the reason behind flying kites on Viswakarma Puja?

Hindu mythology is replete with stories of Gods navigating through the sky in flying chariots. It is believed that Lord Viswakarma is the maker behind those chariots. Kites have a resemblance to those ancient chariots. As a mark of reverence to the divine architect Viswakarma, devotees started paying tribute by flying kites. 

Even today children and adults participate in the custom of kite flying with great enthusiasm. Though with passing time the thrill has started fading out. Still, a sky full of colourful kites is a sight to behold.