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ILSS launches research report challenges women professionals face

The research report was conducted on the basis of data collected from interviews and surveys and highlights the needs of women in mid-career positions.

SNS | New Delhi |

To highlight the challenges women professionals face in the social impact space, India Leaders for Social Sector (ILSS) unveiled the research report “The Emerging Women’s Leadership in the Indian Development Sector” at the launch event on 4 November, along with the launch of the intensive 7-week hybrid learning Program for emerging women leaders in the social sector.

The event was graced by the presence of actor Nandita Das, Retd IPS Manjari Jaruhar; Natasha Zarine, Director of Ecco Sattva Environmental Solutions Private Limited; Sudarshan Suchi, CEO, Save the Children India; and Zubaan founder, writer, activist, Padma Shri awardee Urvashi Butalia, amongst others.

The event included a thought-provoking panel discussion on “Leadership Catalyst for Emerging Women Leaders” and brought out themes like potential challenges in women’s leadership journey, lacunas, and solutions, especially in the development space and to create an enabling environment of support at the ecosystem level for emerging women leaders to thrive and grow.

The research report was conducted on the basis of data collected from interviews and surveys and highlights the needs of women in mid-career positions. Also, as per the report, 84.7% of the women surveyed vocalised the need for having an active support network of senior women leaders as mentors for a positive effect on their career growth; in the social impact space.

Actor, director, and social activist Nandita Das, during her speech, touched on the different challenges women face in their careers and also highlighted the vulnerabilities felt by the women while embarking on their professional journey.

Addressing the audience, Anu Prasad, the Founder, and CEO of ILSS said, “Women comprise 50% of our population. We should have at least 50% of the voice. In terms of numbers, we are a force. Yet we see that women have little or no voice in places of power, be it as representatives in Parliament, titans of the industry, the civil services, or even the development sector.”