An Egyptian court on Sunday sentenced the Supreme Guide of Muslim Brotherhood Mohamed Badie to life imprisonment over storming a police station in the Upper Egypt’s province of Minya in 2013, the media reported.

A total of 64 other members of the Islamic group were also handed life sentence, which is 25 years in jail in Egypt.

The case dates back to August 2013 when the defendants assaulted a police station and killed a policeman, after the army-led ouster of former Islamist President Mohamed Morsi in response to mass protests against his one-year rule.

The other 600 people charged in the same case were sentenced up to 15 years in prison.

They were also found guilty of vandalism, attacking public property, possessing arms and joining illegal organisations, the court said.

Badie, spiritual guide of the Muslim Brotherhood, was handed death sentence for ordering the murder of 10 people in Cairo in 2013.

In January 2010, Badie was elected the Muslim Brotherhood’s eighth chief since its foundation in 1928 after a bitter dispute between ideologically focused conservatives and reformists.

He also received two other life sentences in cases related to espionage for a foreign country and violence.

Most Muslim Brotherhood’s leaders, members and supporters, including Morsi himself, are currently jailed, many of whom have received appealable death and life sentences over various charges ranging from inciting violence and murder to espionage and jailbreak.

Morsi is currently serving a 20-year sentence for inciting deadly clashes between his supporters and opponents in late 2012, and a 25-year jail term for leaking classified documents to Qatar.