Eid ul-Fitr marks the end of Ramadan, the 30 days fasting period. Eid is taking place across the world this week bringing a month of fasting to a close for another year.

“Eid ul-Fitr” literally means “Festival of Breaking the Fast”.

Eid is announced at the beginning of the tenth month of the Islamic calendar called Shawwal, which follows the month of Ramadan. It is believed that Prophet Muhammad got the first revelation of the Holy Quran in this month.

The date of Eid ul-Fitr varies from country to country depending on moon timings and other astronomical factors. The lunar cycle is used to calculate the Islamic Hijri era. This year, the holy month of Ramadan was observed at a different time across India as the moon was not visible in some parts of the country. Therefore, Eid is celebrated on one day in some parts of the country and on another day in others.

The dates of Ramadan and Eid vary every year as the Muslim calendar also known as Hijr is based on the phases of the moon.

This year, the moon is expected to be seen on June 5, and for countries across the International Date Line on the west of it, the moon sighting will likely be on June 6.

Muslims in India with the exception of Kerala, Udupi and Dakshin Kannada districts of Karnataka will celebrate Eid on June 5 if the moon is sighted on June 4.

Gulf countries are yet to convene their panels on moon-sighting. However, six of them have announced that the first day of Eid ul-Fitr will begin on Wednesday, 5th June.