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ISIC Inducts World’s Most Advanced Integrated Robotics and Imaging Platform for Spine Surgeries

This integrated model of health service delivery is in line with the global best practices and is already in use in multiple sites across the US, Europe including the UK, Spain, Italy, Germany, Singapore, and Australia.

SNS | New Delhi |

Using the advanced minimally-invasive robotics procedure doctors of capital have successfully operated on two young girls, suffering from the spinal deformity.

13-year-old Swati was diagnosed with early-onset acquired thoracic scoliosis that bent her at 85 degrees. On the other hand, 16-year-old Mannatpreet was suffering from spinal TB since 2018 and had difficulty in walking following tuberculosis treatment due to weakness in lower limbs. The surgery combining robotics and O-Arm not only helped in improving the accuracy of inserting screws during the surgeries, but it also lowered their risk of paralysis as well as exposure to radiation, blood loss and postoperative pain.

“Spine is the central support structure of the body and hub of several important nerves travelling to other parts of the body. A wrong or extra cut can affect the patient for life. Keeping in mind the interest of our patients, we inducted MAZOR X™ Stealth Edition robotics surgery for spinal, orthopaedic and neurological conditions in 2019. Now, we have integrated it with O-Arm, a technology that has been serving the medical field for over 10 years and has helped treat 900,000 patients all over the world.

This integrated model of health service delivery is in line with the global best practices and is already in use in multiple sites across the US, Europe including the UK, Spain, Italy, Germany, Singapore, and Australia. We have operated on two teenaged girls with different types of the spinal deformity using the integrated system and have received excellent results,” says Dr HS Chhabra, Medical Director & Chief of Spine, Indian Spinal Injuries Centre, New Delhi.

By combining O-arm with Robotics, doctors were able to monitor the site of the surgery and how it is progressing in real-time. In both the cases at ISIC, doctors and the surgical team were able to see the images of the site displayed on a large mobile viewing station before, during and after the surgery, backed by a unique ‘Patient Connection Platform’ – a set of biocompatible devices that rigidly fix the robotic arm to the patient’s skeletal anatomy during surgery through a stable, solid metal extension ensuring precision and accuracy.

The integrated system can enable healthcare providers to skip mandatory pre and post-operative steps such as a CT scan or MRI as developments can be monitored as they take place on the operation table. Besides, the combination reduces drastically the possibility of a patient getting paralyzed post-operation or acquiring an infection, which, in turn, contributes to faster recovery and shorter hospitalization period.