The two-day international symposium on “Competitiveness of North Indian States to achieve Inclusive Growth’ stressed the crucial role of states in acting as regulatory laboratories to find solutions for social and economic challenges before implementation at the national level.

Organised by CUTS (Consumer Unity and Trust Society) International, Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) and Federation of Indian Micro and Small and Medium Enterprises (FISME) at Chandigarh earlier this week, the symposium highlighted the potential of economic growth and efficient governance through cooperative federalism.

CUTS International, a non-profit making organisation, is a NGO pursuing social justice and economic equity within and across the borders. It is a partner to the US Embassy for the project ‘Evaluation of Competitiveness of North Indian States’.

The event saw participation of approximately 100 participants from  North Indian States, which included senior policy makers, top industry representatives and academicians.

Secretary General, CUTS International, Pradeep S Mehta, set the stage for deliberations on enhancing EoDB via state competitiveness.

He highlighted the need for state governments to formulate optimal regulations by learning lessons from the policy failures and drawing conclusions for the future from it, which would ease doing business for MSMEs in particular.

He also shared the findings of the two-year initiative of CUTS on state competitiveness and emphasised on the importance of third party assessment of reforms implemented by governments, undertake cost/benefit analysis of regulations so as to reduce regulatory burden and re-engineering the regulatory framework in India.

Lead Economist, Trade and Competitiveness, World Bank, Sebastian Saez stressed on the need for state governments to focus on quality of regulations along with transparency in regulations.

Director, North India office, US embassy, Ariel Pollock and Daniel Mitchell, Chairman, Centre for Freedom Prosperity discussed a few American good practices on promoting state competitiveness.