OCCASIONAL NOTE

Presumably the withdrawal of the Rumanians from Budapest may be regarded as one important matter in which the will of the Supreme Council has prevailed. It is a curious example of the new order of things since the armistice that British and Italian troops should now be engaged in Hungary for policing work. The problem of the Baltic Provinces still remains to be solved. The German Government have pleaded pathetically that they cannot persuade their troops to come home. The Supreme Council finds the story unconvincing, and has instructed Marshal Foch to send another note to Berlin. The Allies agree to the German suggestion that a joint commission shall be appointed to enforce evacuation, but certain conditions are imposed which will enable the German Government to be as good as their word and which, no doubt, will be cordially endorsed at Berlin accordingly. Another touch of opera bouffe has now been given to the affair by the proclamation which the “German Free Corps” in Courland is reported to have addressed to “the German Fatherland and all civilised people,” and which declares that, notwithstanding the orders of the German Government issued under pressure of the Entente, this corps “will remain at the front to protect the German frontier against the Bolshevists.” What these devoted heroes will do when their pay and supplies are cut off and the joint commission arrives to see that there is no camouflage in the matter remains to be seen.

GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL, CUTTACK

The opening ceremony of the new hostel building of the Ravenshaw Girls’ High School, Cuttack, was held today. Mr. Luby, the District Magistrate presided. There was a large attendance of ladies and gentlemen representing all communities. The older girls sang Sanskrit and Ooriya songs composed, respectively by Pandit Gopinath Mahapatra and Babu Shashi Bhusan Ray for the occasion. The Commissioner of Orissa, the Hon. Mr. J.F. Gruning, gave a short history of the progress of the hostel since it was taken over by Government. He explained the special necessity of big compounds and well-ventilated rooms for girls’ hostels. He remarked that special provision had been made for Hindu girls – a separate kitchen and a completely secluded inner compound had been arranged for them. The hostel is a handsome two-storied building containing a large dining room, sitting rooms and studies on the lower floor and three large dormitories and eight teachers’ bedrooms on the upper floor.

PASSAGES TO INDIA

BOMBAY, OCT 9

In view of the Government’s wholesale commandeering of outward passenger accommodation, the committee of the Bombay Chamber understand that despite the facilities recently provided many mercantile men are unable to obtain passages to India. The position, consequently, is very serious, and grave dislocation of business and loss to trade will result if the Government do not arrange that all requiring immediate passages should be enabled to arrive here before January. This Chamber urgently requests your Committee, after verification, to represent the matter to the Government and do its utmost to clear up the position immediately. We fully recognise that military needs must be met, but in the opinion of this Chamber special chartering should be resorted to on an adequate scale without delay.

INDIANS IN SOUTH AFRICA

SIMLA, OCT 9

In connection with the announcement made by His Excellency the Viceroy in his opening speech at the recent meeting of the Imperial Legislative Council that Sir Benjamin Robertson is to be deputed to South Africa as the representative of the Government of India to attend the Commission which is to be appointed to enquire into Indian grievances in that country, it was first intended that Sir Benjamin Robertson should go to South Africa immediately, but it has now been ascertained that on account of the formation of a new Cabinet due to the lamented death of General Botha the Commission is not likely to meet until after the beginning of next year.

STEEL STRIKE IN AMERICA

The first day of the steel strike showed that twenty States were affected. Disorders are only reported from a few places. Guards shot seven persons at Newcastle, Pennsylvania, one of them mortally. Numerous arrests have been made in various centres. Reports of the second day record several gains for the strikers, particularly in Ohio. Many additional works in Chicago and Pittsburg have closed down. Rioting continues in several places, and encounters with guards are occurring. Casualties so far are one dead, three probably fatally wounded, and scores hurt. The Senate has decided immediately to investigate the strike situation, with a view to possible Government intervention.