OCCASIONAL NOTE
Mr Ure’s appointment to the Presidency of the Scottish Court of Session has been so plainly foreshadowed that the official announcement will create no surprise. His qualifications for the post are beyond dispute. He was for ten years lecturer on Constitutional Law and History in Glasgow University, for four years Solicitor-General for Scotland and for four years Lord Advocate. His advancement to an office from which political interests are excluded creates a vacancy in the Parliamentary representation of Linlithgowshire and deprives the Liberal party of one of its most combative lieutenants. Lord Dunedin, whose promotion from the Presidency of the Court of Session to a Lordship of Appeal is the occasion of Mr. Ure’s advancement, is almost as well known in the world of outdoor pastimes as in that of law. He was a famous racquet player in his youth and has been captain of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club and of the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers. Sir John Hamilton, who becomes a Lord of Appeal, and Sir Walter Phillimore, the new Lord Justice of Appeal, have been Judges of the King’s Bench the former since 1909 and the latter since 1897.

MYSORE ASSEMBLY
Questions On Public Service
(From Our Correspondent)
Bangalore, Oct 13

The concluding feature of the work before the Mysore Representative Assembly on the opening day was the reception of addresses from the Kolar Gold Mining Board, the Central Mahomedan Association, and three other provincial bodies. Replying collectively, Mr. Visvesvaraya, the Dewan, said that various questions raised therein would be considered in detail at the present session of the Assembly, including a prayer for railway extension to Koppa, in the coffee district of Kadur. In some of the addresses read reference was made to the paucity of representation of special communities in public service, in the Legislative Council, and other bodies. The Dewan replied that, while the Government were fully alive to the need for reasonable facilities to backward classes he would remind them that owing to the growing complexity of modern administration, a higher standard of average attainment and capacity of public service had now to be insisted upon. He advised them to educate their young men.

A BOMBAY REFORM
Destruction Of Bad Food
(From Our Correspondent)
Bombay, Oct 13

A striking feature about the report of the Municipal Commissioners of Bombay for the year ending March last is the enormous destruction of food seized as unfit, which totalled over a quarter of a million pounds. This is almost double the quantity which was seized during the preceding year. The increase is not due to the fact that the quality of the food-supply is any worse than in previous years, but to the fact that recent amendments of the Municipal Act have given the police and railway authorities the power of seizing and destroying fish of questionable quality, and to enhanced vigilance on the part of the market authorities. Of a quarter of a million pounds destroyed 200,000, pounds were fish.

RESCUE OPERATIONS
New York, Oct 13

The Uranium has left to search for the bodies of those who lost their lives in the Volturno disaster.
Another steamer is leaving Halifax. Apparently only 31 of the Volturno’s crew, of which 10 are officers, have been saved. This appears to confirm the view that the bulk of the crew of 93 men took to the boats.
The mechanical manager of the Daily Mail, who was a passenger on the Carmania, sends a wireless message that rescue was impossible till the tank steamer Narragansett arrived on the scene, and poured out two large streams of oil under the Volturno’s stern.