Nepal government takes a step ahead over its claim to the areas which it sketched in its new map as the country is set to send the revised map to India, the United Nations and the International community by the middle of August, a minister has said.

The recently revised map, which has spiked Nepal’s controversy with friendly neighbour India, claims Kalapani, Lipulekh and Limpiyadhura as its own.

“We will be sending the updated map including Kalapani, Lipulekh, and Limpiyadhura to various UN agencies and the international community including India. The process will be completed by the middle of this month,” Padma Aryal, Minister for Land Management, Cooperatives and Poverty Alleviation told news agency ANI.

Reports further suggest that the Ministry has asked the Department of Measurement to print 4,000 copies of the updated version of Nepal’s map in English and send it to the international community. At least 25,000 copies of the updated map have been distributed across the nation. Nepal’s map is part of its emblem and is used on all official stationary by that country, just like the Indian government’s letterheads have the Lion Capital of Ashoka.

The development comes amid a bitter internal feud in Nepal’s ruling Nepal Communist Party.

Party executive chairperson Pushpa Kamal Dahal “Prachanda” have demanded Oli’s resignation, saying his recent anti-India remarks were “neither politically correct nor diplomatically appropriate.”

The Lipulekh pass is a far western point near Kalapani, a disputed border area between Nepal and India. Both India and Nepal claim Kalapani as an integral part of their territory – India as part of Uttarakhand’s Pithoragarh district and Nepal as part of Dharchula district.