Indians are more likely to believe the COVID crisis will get resolved sooner in India than it will globally. Nearly half (48%) think the pandemic is likely to lose steam in India within the next three months (end of May- end of July), which is higher than the number of people hoping for the same to happen globally within this time frame (40%), says a survey.

Fewer Indians (32%) think it may take longer (end of August- end of October) till the crisis resolves in India, but the number of people saying this for the situation changing globally is slightly higher- at 36%.

Fewer than this, both locally (7%) and globally (10%) think the pandemic may last till the end of the year (end of November- end of December) till it is under control.

All India Institute of Medical Science (AIIMS) Director Randeep Guleria on previous Thursday said that India may witness the peak of COVID-19 cases in June or July, adding, that earlier it was analysed that the peak will be in May but due to extended lockdown the peak has also been extended.

When asked about returning back to normal life, people seem more likely to return to public places such as parks and gardens, college and universities, malls and cinema halls (27% each), and restaurants and hotels (25%) once the number of COVID positive cases in the country are under control (27% each). Three in ten (31%) would consider visiting their friends and family at their homes under similar circumstances.

23% are willing to take a domestic holiday or a staycation when there is no further spike in cases, but when it comes to travelling internationally, Indians are more likely to do so either when the spread of new cases in controlled globally with 21% saying this or when a vaccine to prevent COVID-19 is widely available (20%).

On the other hand, 29 percent Indians say they are more likely to return back to their offices or workplace once the government removes restrictions on movement. A fifth are willing to do so when businesses open again.

While the Coronavirus is one of the greatest health crises faced by mankind, it has changed the world in some areas. According to 68 per cent, the biggest positive impact is believed to be on the environment. Recently, thousands of flamingos flocked to the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), with The Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) estimating that numbers are 25% higher than the previous year.

The virus has also taught us to value what we have and 50% of the respondents think it has helped us appreciate our loved ones and the society.

On overall positivity and outlook, many believe it may lead to technological advancements (43%), stronger domestic supply chain (35%) and less polarisation within the society (27%). A handful of people (6%), however, believe there will be nothing good coming out of this crisis.Corona