Follow Us:

Smiling Shashi Kapoor will never smile again

Shashi Kapoor, the youngest son of Prithviraj Kapoor, who bore the closest resemblance to his father, passed away in Mumbai at the age of 79.

Shoma Chatterji |

Shashi Kapoor – the handsome and eversmiling charm with a dimple in one cheek will never smile ever again. Shashi Kapoor, the youngest son of Prithviraj Kapoor, who bore the closest resemblance to his father, passed away in Mumbai at the age of 79.

Among his 175-and odd films, mainly as hero, his most outstanding role was in Romesh Sharma’s New Delhi Times which fetched him the National Award almost at the end of his career as actor.
Old-timers who have watched Raj Kapoor’s Awara, will recall the small boy who played the child Raj in the film.

He was a Merchant-Ivory favourite and began his stint with English language films as the young husband in The Householder, based on a novel by Ruth Prawer Jhabwala opposite Leela Naidu.
He won the Dadasaheb Phalke Award for his rich contribution to cinema. He is also responsible for having resurrected his father’s Prithvi Theatre now looked after by daughter Sanjana.

He remained ignored as an Actor because his smashing looks somehow marginalised his talents as an actor par excellence.

Even so, glimpses of his histrionics came across in films like Trishul, Deewar Trishul, Junoon and many more.

He produced Aparna Sen’s first directorial film 36, Chowringhee Lane which bagged many awards. He married Jennifer Kendall also from theatre android leaves behind three children, Karan, Kunal and Sanjana, all successful in their own professions.

He had put on a lot of weight over the past decade that led to several health related problems.

He began his career in English theatre where he met his wife. Many years later, he did the lighting for a play Gaslight presented by his daughter.

He was erudite and had a healthy rapport with his peers like Amitabh Bachchan, Shabana Azmi, Sharmila Tagore among others.

READ ALSO: Shashi Kapoor dead, leaves behind memories ‘forever’