Pakistan’s Muttahida Quami Movement (MQM) on Thursday rejected a BBC report that alleged India has been helping the party with funds and training to create unrest in its stronghold of Karachi.

In a statement the party’s coordination committee said the allegations levelled against the MQM were not new.

It said "MQM is a peace-loving political party that believes in the unity and integrity of Pakistan".

"MQM was accused of the Jinnahpur Conspiracy in the past and a host of other allegations to blemish its image. All these allegations proved to be false in the fullness of time," the statement said.

In the same manner, India has also rejected having any connection with the MQM but some anti-MQM elements are bent on carrying out media trial of the MQM by repeating the allegation again and again.

The Karachi-based party said the new report is part of the media trial that is going on against it for many years and "aimed at tarnishing the image of the MQM in Pakistan and throughout the world".

The coordination committee said, "We believe that people of Pakistan will reject this false and baseless report in the same way as they have been doing in the past".

India had also dismissed the BBC report as "completely baseless".

The UK authorities started investigating the MQM in 2010 when a senior party leader, Imran Farooq, was stabbed to death outside his home in north London.

In the course of those inquiries Scotland Yard found around 500,000 pounds in the MQM’s London offices and in the home of its leader Altaf Hussain. That prompted a second investigation into possible money laundering.

Hussain has lived in self-imposed exile in the UK for more than 20 years. He was given a British passport in 2002.

A number of MQM leaders, including Hussain, have been arrested in relation to the money-laundering case but no-one has been charged.

The party insists that all its funds are legitimate and that most of them come from donors in the business community in Karachi.