Delhi is expanding rapidly and so is the daily volume of garbage generated here. It’s a bleak picture with less sites for landfill and huge expenses required to tackle organic waste, a considerable part of the daily garbage volume.

The Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD) has decided to set up compost plants by April. Roshanara Park, Ajmal Khan Park, Qudsia Park and Shalimar Bagh Garden have been identified as the four possible sites for these plants.

The project was mooted after the National Green Tribunal (NGT) flagged MCD in November for indiscriminate dumping of waste. The NGT had also banned burning of garbage in the open.

"Around 20 tonnes of green waste is generated every day at these four parks only. Currently all green waste goes to landfill sites," North Delhi Municipal Corporation spokesperson Yogendra Maan told thestatesman.com.

Abhishek Gupta, who has got the contract for the composting project, said, "The city will develop and more garbage will be generated. Composting will become a huge industry in the future. The compost machine will require a space of just 25 feet. It will solve the problem of finding landfill sites and save the cost of transporting garbage.

"We have installed the plant at Lodi Garden, Delhi Cantonment and Faridabad. However, the plant at Lodi Garden is facing a legal case, Gupta told thestatesman.com.

When asked about the criteria for setting up a plant, Gupta informed, "Before setting up the machine at any area, we carry out extensive research. We analyse what kind of organic waste is produced – leftover food, waste from temples generated after rituals, incense sticks, flowers, cow dung and the like. After that we install the machine.

Talking about the mechanism, Gupta said, "Segregation is done manually. Then we shred the waste in small particles, followed by dehydration. The last stage involves the making of a by-product. The whole process takes around eight to ten hours and involves four persons at each site.

The processing leads to benefits such as fuel generation. According to Gupta, the waste can be processed into manure or fuel sticks to generate electricity.